On 16 August 2019, when the debtor of the company did not comply with the OCPRS within the meaning of the agreement, the financial creditor filed a business application under Article 7 of the IBC to request the opening of insolvency proceedings against the debtor. The Insolvency and Bankruptcy Act 2016 (`IBC`) is set to become one of the most dynamic laws in India. Over a short period of three years, the CWB has undergone a large number of changes through amendments, regulations and judgments. The Hon`ble Supreme Court of India has played a decisive role in interpreting various provisions of the IBC in order to make it a viable legislation. Accordingly, in its long-awaited judgment of the Essar Steel Creditors` Committee v Satish Kumar Gupta & Ors (`the Essar judgment`), the Supreme Court upshared several contentious issues in the IBC. At the same time, however, it has opened a Pandora`s box, which includes the write-off of creditors` undecided claims after the resolution plan has been approved. This section 8 of the Arbitration Act, which provides for the power of a judicial authority to refer the parties to arbitration, is mandatory. The arbitration clause of the agreement is broad enough to cover disputes between the parties, all of which have the character of commercial disputes. The company`s petition has the character of a “disguised” petition, since the real dispute concerns the agreement between the parties and its interpretation. The defendant/financial creditor is not a financial creditor of the plaintiff/business debtor. The business debtor is a very profitable and debt-free business and does not need a solution. The real dispute between the parties concerns matters relating to the agreement between the parties and the interpretation of their various clauses The applicant/debtor of a business has, in accordance with section 8 of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996, the right to make a claim before a judicial forum at the earliest opportunity available to request a reference to a CIRP arbitration may be opened by both financial creditors: down to earth. an operational creditor or a business debtor.

The insolvency and bankruptcy regime is divided into two phases, namely “recovery” and “liquidation”. As part of the examination of the claim, the creditor asks the CIRP to deal with the debtor of the company through the creation of a creditor committee (“COC”) and the appointment of a resolution expert. In the absence of a resolution plan or if the resolution plan submitted by the COC is not approved within the time limit, the liquidation procedure is initiated in court. According to the Insolvent and Bankruptcy Board of India (Liquidation Process) (Amendment) Regulations, 2019 (“Amended Regulations”) if the debtor company is in liquidation, interested parties may update their claims if they filed them during the CIRP upon presentation of formal evidence. . . .